All Children Deserve a Family "All Children Deserve a Family"

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About The Children

Frequently Asked Questions:






Where are the children waiting for adoption? Have all legal ties to their birth parents been terminated?
Why are the children living in foster care? Why is the term "Special Needs" used to define these children?
What do the children need or expect? What is the cost of adoption? Can I receive any assistance to adopt? What are the tax implications?
We both work and can't afford for one of us to quit to take care of an adoptive child. I am single and do not own my home. Can I still adopt?
Myths About Adoption We have children and we want to adopt.

Where are the children waiting for adoption?

Some of the children live with foster care families, in foster care group homes, in residential treatment facilities or nursing homes, due to their special medical needs, but none of the children are living with their birth families or relatives.


Have all legal ties to their birth parents been terminated?

All children photo-listed in state and national online Heart Gallery photo-listings are considered "legally-free". This means that a court has determined the rights of the parents to be legally terminated.

Why are the children living in foster care?

The reasons may include death or permanent, total incapacity of the parent(s), and no relatives available to care for the child(ren). A child or sibling group may have been legally removed from the birth family for reasons of neglect, or where physical, sexual or emotional abuse is proved. When the children cannot be returned to the family and be properly protected and cared for, the legal rights of the parents are terminated by a court and a permanent living situation for the child(ren) is sought. If suitable relatives are not able to care for them, adoption by a non-relative is the next, best alternative.

 

Why is the term "Special Needs" used to define these children?

Does "special needs" mean that a child is physically disabled or has severe medical or emotional challenges? Certainly these needs would be considered "special needs". However "special needs" within the adoption field most likely means the children are simply older, belong to an ethnic minority, or are part of a sibling group and bear the emotional burden of having been abused or neglected. Sometimes a child may have a risk factor such as prior exposure to drugs or alcohol before birth which may put them at risk for developmental delays or learning problems in the future. They may have been abandoned. There may be no family or relative history, which would also put them at risk.

A child considered to have "special needs" is frequently entitled to receive benefits, such as increased financial assistance, Medicaid, or therapeutic support services, while in foster care. These benefits can continue after adoption.

"Special Needs" refers to children in foster care who meet one or more of the following criteria:

      • The child is at least age 2 and part of an ethnic minority.
      • The child is at least eight years old.
      • The child is mentally, physically, or emotionally disabled.
      • The child belongs to an ethnic minority.
      • The child is a part of a sibling group that needs to be placed together.

       

What do the children need or expect?

The children are real, unique personalities who need love, understanding and, above all, acceptance. Each child is an individual. What one child expects, or hopes for, may be quite different from another. Many children really don't know what to expect. Their experience of family life may have been neglectful, abusive or hurtful. What all children hope, deep down, is that any family with whom they are placed will care about them, be patient and accept them for who they are and demonstrate love and tender affection.

 

What is the cost of adoption? Can I receive any assistance to adopt? What are the tax implications?

The cost of adoption through a public state agency is nominal. Adoption assistance is available in different forms including tax credits.

We both work and can't afford for one of us to quit to take care of an adoptive child.

Both parents may work and still adopt children.

 

I am single and do not own my home. Can I still adopt?

Yes, single parent families can adopt and you do not have to own your home to adopt a child.

 

We have children and we want to adopt.

Many families who adopt have birth children who are still living in their homes or who have grown up and moved out on their own.

 

Myths About Adoption

  • You have to be rich.
  • You have to own your house.
  • You have to be married.
  • You can't have your own children.
  • That it's easy and that anyone can do it.
  • That the foster parents always adopt the children.
  • That the children are going to love you instantly.
  • That you need to be a perfect parent in order to foster or adopt.
 

 

"Adoptive parents know that solutions are never simple and there are no roadmaps."

Challenges Include:

  • Sharing your life and home with children who are angry, hurt and scared.
  • Sharing your life with children who have experienced losses and now spend their days anticipating the next one.
  • Sharing your adopted children with all of the other "moms and dads" they have had.
  • Loving children, whose past experiences will impact their ability and willingness to trust and become part of a new family.

We have found this program beneficial in finding families for our children. We ask that as you view the children, consider that they live in our communities. Respect their right to privacy, and be aware that they may attend school or church, or play at the local park with your children and relatives. The availability of their pictures leaves our children recognizable and vulnerable to negative attention. Although we strive to protect them, we need your help. Thank you!

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